3 Keys to Enhancing Your Competitive Advantage Today

f0fa8bc1-0be6-4f2f-8294-a9ffaa404046 Game Changer
During a recent SPE luncheon Hess presented their results and achievements in implementing Lean in their oil and gas operations. They demonstrated outstanding successes and improvements in performance, reducing costs and more.
Lean is about maximizing customer value while minimizing waste, increasing revenues and improving results. Following their success they are expecting their suppliers and contractors to demonstrate commitment and implement Lean programs!  So what should you consider in establishing a Lean program to show commitment and enhance your competitive advantage?
 
Strategy
Lean needs to be a sustainable key strategic commitment cascading from the top down throughout the organization.  Without management’s commitment Lean is just another flavor of the month initiative.
 
Leadership
It is up to leadership to communicate and lead on a continuous basis the implementation of a Lean improvement program. They must cascade accountability and seek out opportunities for improvement in every work process ranging from accounting, management, operations and customer acquisition.
 
Culture
Culture encompasses the values and behaviors of an organization in its execution of the strategy and delivery of results. It is management’s responsibility to nurture the right attitudes and create an environment that motivates its valued resources to achieving the business objectives. Management must make Lean thinking, acting and behaviors a cornerstone of every aspect of their daily business.
 
Winning Results
Rome was not built in a day; however, the ROI from Lean successes can start in less than a week. Companies have realized bottom line improvements of 25 to 45%.  With a continuous program and winning results you can demonstrate your enhanced competitive advantage when your client asks – Are you Lean?
Ask how we can help your team enhance your competitive advantage through a successful Lean initiative.
 
Author – Charles Wilds is senior management consultant with over 30 years of experience in contracting, operations and strategic business development. He works with leadership and organizations to drive alignment to winning behaviors and performance for faster growth and greater profitability.

Are ATTITUDES affecting your RESULTS?

253ae1e9-1b46-4df6-9a0c-d216e14d5a8bIn our MUST-DO Strategies post last time we highlighted that to meet today’s challenges for high quality sustainable growth CEOs are focusing their strategies on Human Capital, Customer Relations and Operational Excellence. Let’s look at Human Capital – those mission critical resources necessary for business success.

If you want to improve results there are many initiatives you can try but in the end the most effective way may be to get more out of what you already have through behavioral based change. Attitudes affect behaviors which directly impact results.

Do you need an attitude or behavioral based change? Ask yourself and your teams the following questions:

  • What would an improvement in management team effectiveness mean to results?
  • What is turnover of mission critical resources really costing us?
  • How are our culture and behaviors impacting results?
  • How well do we work together as a team?
  • How are our quality and behaviors affecting client attraction and retention?

If there is a disparity with any of the answers to above or you just want to get better, you may need a positive behavioral based change. Ask us how our INSIDE-OUT Success Formula can improve attitudes and your bottom line results, FAST!

Ask us how we can help Empower your potential to Excel and Perform!

Five Keys to Employee Engagement, Retention and Attraction

Engagement

It can’t be forced. It doesn’t have to be complicated. And…it’s largely in your control.

Companies spend time and money to measure, maximize and promote, often with posters and making impressive-sounding proclamations. Yet they rarely encourage leaders to do the simple, everyday things that make a sustained difference.

This article highlights what great leaders do to create an environment that inspires all employees to be their best. Emphasis on “inspires,” as you can not coerce engagement. Emphasis on “best,” as most employees are hungry for work that maximizes their strengths and challenges them to improve.

A seminal report by the Conference Board summarized findings from a number of research studies on employee engagement. They define employee engagement as “a heightened emotional and intellectual connection that an employee has for his/her job, organization, manager, or co-workers that, in turn, influences him/her to apply additional discretionary effort to his/her work.”

The report also found that the most powerful driver of employee engagement is the employee/manager relationship – specifically, managers who care about their employees’ well being, foster trust, and lead with integrity.

In the quest for true engagement, what matters most are leaders who are tuned in, turned on, and who consistently call forth the best effort and best attitudes of employees. And not only does this pay off big time for the organization, but it pays off big time for YOU as well!

So, if you are ready to improve business results and eager to retain top talent, then you are ready for the 5-A Model for Engagement. It details specific tools and practices to cultivate personal and productive employee relationships.

5-A MODEL for Engagement

1. ALIGNMENT: Fit of employee talents and capabilities with role
2. ATTENTION: Ways a leader pays attention to employee
3. ATTITUDE: Positive thinking and positive guidance for positive outcomes
4. APPRECIATION: Cultivating and expressing gratitude and recognition
5. AUTHENTICITY: Leading in a way that is true to one’s own unique strengths, personal style and professional perspective

ALIGNMENT

Alignment addresses the fit between an employee’s strengths and interests with their job responsibilities. For many people I’ve coached, their biggest challenge is that they are asked to do what they cannot do or be what they are not, and the individual is seen as having a “performance issue” rather than being in the wrong job.

So the first task if you want to engage your employees is to be vigilant about uncovering, articulating, and advocating their strengths. This is not always as simple as it sounds. Most managers are trained to find and address what’s lacking in an employee. But research tells us, that we would be wise to spend our time developing and utilizing a person’s strengths as opposed to eliminating their weaknesses.

Additionally, employees feel better and do better when their strengths are aligned with their work. In fact, using the other 4 A’s in this model – and not aligning an employee’s skills and interests with the work – will not result in full engagement.

Tips to Create Alignment:

Two of the many tools on the market that help capture strengths I recommend are: StrengthsFinder found in the book, Now Discover Your Strengths by Marcus Buckingham and Donald O. Clifton, and VIA Signature Strengths survey which is free and can be found at http://www.viasurvey.org

Ask your employees, “Tell me about a time when you felt most engaged at work…what was happening? What skills were you using?” Ask your employees, “Do you feel you have a chance to use your best strengths in your job?” When promoting or moving people into new roles, ask yourself if the employees will still have a chance to use their strengths. This is especially important when promoting stellar individual performers into management positions.

ATTENTION

Attention includes the physical and non-physical ways you focus on employees. Your most valued resource is your attention. And the quality and nature of how you pay attention speaks volumes about you and the value you place on your employees. Paying positive attention to your employee’s strengths and interests is critical to engagement.

Additionally, you should also look at all they do right, their career ambitions, families, hobbies, concerns, goals. Even employees who prefer some privacy appreciate your asking.

Body language is BIG. Notice how you physically give attention to your employees. Do you use their name when speaking to them? Do you look them in the eye? Shake their hand? Restate what you hear them say? Do you show up at meetings on time? And very important, when in group meetings or one-on-one discussions, do you eliminate distractions like email and phone calls?

Tips for Giving Attention

Turn off all appliances and tune in to your employees.
Ask employees about their career ambitions, hopes, and fears.
Ask employees about their outside interests and families.
Make eye contact and use the name of the person you are speaking with.
Give employees at least 3 positive statements for every critical one.
Say good morning and good evening.
Celebrate the good stuff!

ATTITUDE

The two key behaviors that contribute to displaying and inspiring a positive attitude are positive thinking and positive feeling.

With positive thinking, you approach challenges from a realistically optimistic perspective rather than a pessimistic or victim-oriented one. Realistic optimism doesn’t mean denying problems: It means applying your efforts – and the efforts of others – on what you can control, expecting that by doing so the future will be better.

Pessimistic managers see organizational challenges as pervasive and out of their control, “I’m such a bad manager. This company is going down hill.” Realistically optimistic managers see challenges as opportunities, consider the bad stuff as temporary, and believe in their own resourcefulness and the resourcefulness of others. “It’s true that we’re going through a rough patch. Now what can we do to make it better?”

While some leaders tend towards pessimism or optimism, anyone can choose an optimistic approach to work. Doing so not only feels better but results in better outcomes. Employees want to be engaged with positive people and rewarding endeavors. You must lead the way.

Second, use positive emotion to promote useful outcomes. We all recognize that the simple cold is quite contagious. What is less obvious is how contagious a bad mood can be — especially when it belongs to the manager. Science has established that like physical viruses, moods are indeed contagious. Additionally, negative feelings such as anxiety and anger not only feel bad but shut us down and close us off to new ideas; we become less creative and resourceful.

Barbara Frederickson developed a “broaden-and-build theory of positive emotions” that finds that “There is now hard data showing positive emotions give us access to cognitive, social, psychological and physical resources. In other words, they make us smarter, more creative, more social, and healthier.” And not surprisingly, people in positive moods are more liked by others and more open to ideas and experiences (Frederickson, 1998). The bottom line is that negative emotions tear down — positive emotions build up.

This research, and our own anecdotal experience, suggest how leaders lead and employ smart behaviors that you can use to enhance your — and others’ — emotions.

Tips for Creating a Positive Attitude

·Before going into a meeting, ask yourself what kind of attitude will help work get done at the meeting. The answer will lead you to some ideas for how you want to behave.
·Ration the time you spend with people with negative attitudes.
·Ask yourself and/or your team, “What’s in our control?”
·If someone responds negatively try saying, “That may be AND…”
·To promote positive feelings in yourself, consider the following 5-minute attitude adjustment activities:

oPay attention to your thinking

oGo for a fast power walk in the parking lot

oSpend a few minutes paying attention to your breath

oWrite an email to yourself stating what your goal is and note what thoughts and feelings will assist you in attaining

your goal

oLook at a picture of your family or favorite vacation spot

oAnd yes, one of my clients played the theme song to Rocky every time he wanted to psyche himself up for a big

meeting or moment.

APPRECIATION

“The deepest principle of human nature is the craving to be appreciated” – William James.

Not only is appreciating a smart strategy for engaging others, but taking time to deeply appreciate what we have fills our tank as well.

You might be thinking that cultivating appreciation is well worn advice–something we heard from our parents or teachers. And that may be. But good common sense is often uncommon. Further, while appreciation is indeed an underused strategy for engagement, there are actually many barriers to practicing it.

For starters, if you are like many leaders, you may consider yourself a high achiever. One thing we know about high achievers is that they are often focused on future goals. And that future orientation makes leaders vulnerable to not seeing all that is currently happening and all that has already been achieved.

Managers are paid to solve problems and put out fires. You’re quick to see what’s not working rather than what is working. You usually look three steps ahead. Again, this tendency can come at the expense of appreciating people now and accomplishments now.

And it’s easy to rely too heavily on reward and recognition programs instead of smaller, sometimes more impactful displays of genuine appreciation. Employees make countless contributions made by employees every day that may not merit formal recognition, but without them we and our organizations could not succeed.

And the last barrier to appreciating is simply the pace of our lives: We forget to stop and appreciate.

Tips for Cultivating Appreciation

·Start or end your meetings with “thank you’s” or personal acknowledgments, (even better if you invite everyone to join in).
·Keep a supply of monogrammed note cards in your desk and make it a point to write a few each week.
·One client enjoyed keeping 10 pennies in his left pants pocket, and every time he gave a sincere acknowledgement he moved a penny from his left pant pocket to his right pant pocket. His goal was to have all 10 pennies moved by the day’s end.
·Spend 5 minutes at the end of each week writing down what you appreciate that week – feel free to include non-work happenings, and by all means, feel free to engage your team and/or your family in the activity. As they say, “What we appreciate appreciates…”
·Leave a note somewhere reminding you to be appreciative.
·And lest you think showing appreciation is just something for the good times – it is even more important when things don’t go well. Consider the manager who when his team was faced with a setback, instead of pointing fingers, asked, “What’s here for us to learn? What can we appreciate about this challenge?”

AUTHENTICITY

Being authentic means expressing yourself in ways that are in keeping with your own authentic style and temperament and with a sincere desire to make your relationships work. Employees can see through technique, so by all means adapt these suggestions in ways that feel good to you. The only caveat is if for instance you recognize an opportunity to be more appreciative, and choose to use a new behavior such as sending thank you notes, realize that at first it may feel awkward because it’s new – which is different from not being authentic.

Tips for Cultivating Authenticity
·Clarify and articulate your core values – use them as anchors and guideposts to inform your leadership actions.
·Tell the truth — and if you don’t know, say so.
·Tell personal stories that demonstrate times you have overcome adversity, managed change, or accomplished an important goal.
·Invest in your own development – know and claim your strengths and weaknesses.
·Honor your commitments.
·Lead by example.

So What’s in it for You?

I love win/win/win propositions, and the good news is that using these 5 A’s of Engagement results in increased engagement for your employees, your company and you!

Align people’s strengths to their job, attend to their needs with keen focus, bring a positive attitude (via thoughts and feelings) to work challenges, consistently convey appreciation for your employees efforts. Practicing these behaviors will inspire higher levels of performance, enhance retention and generate greater commitment to results. You will feel GREAT about yourself as a leader, and the increased commitment and contributions from those you work with will wow you! Promise. Now, here’s to you!

References

Conference Board Report: Employee Engagement: A Review of Current Research and its Implications, 2006. “What Good are Positive Emotions?” by B.L. Frederickson, 1998. Review of General Psychology, 2, pp. 300-319.

Author: Cheryl Rice

 

When Employees Set Standards

Source: Winning Every Day: The Game Plan for Success, by Lou Holtz

When Andy Heck played football for head coach Lou Holtz at Notre Dame, he switched positions on the offensive line. It was a tough transition.  One day, watching game films with the assistant coach, Heck complained about a negative grade the coach gave him for a play that Heck thought was OK.”Andy, I don’t think you’re an average player,” the assistant coach said, stopping the film. “Do you want me to grade you as an average player so your mark will be positive? Or should I grade you as a great player, in which case your performance on that play was a minus? You choose.”Heck chose “great player,” and Holtz says, “He immediately elevated his personal standards.”Heck became Notre Dame’s team captain and enjoyed a solid professional career with the Chicago Bears. Holtz believes the coach’s question that day—and Heck’s choice—launched that success.

Suggestion: Challenge employees to set their own standards. Their motivation to succeed will bestronger than if they try to reach goals others impose.

How Does Controlling One’s Attention Contribute To Safety In The Workplace?

One of my favorite quotes from Tom Peters is his statement that after 25 years of consulting, everything he’s learned can be boiled down into five words: Attention is all there is. What you put your attention to, is what you get. Try to wake people up to the fact that all of us have attention patterns that are somewhat restrictive, that are useful in certain circumstances but mismatched in other kinds of situations. Generally people who are very good at focusing their attention and blocking out distractions also miss things in their environment. When you’re driving, for example, you’re looking straight ahead and you don’t see things on the side. On a safety level, that can be dangerous. Try to show people where they’re good and where they need improvement, and give them some specific exercises and techniques for broadening their effectiveness

Right First Impressions

Engagement happens. In every moment of every interaction with every prospect, you have an opportunity to engage someone. You’ve all heard the stats on how people communicate: 55% through body language, 38% through tone of voice, and a measly 7% through the words that are actually spoken. And those stats even hold true for the written word. (Make sure that all of those hours and hours you’re spending pouring over the right choice of words in your framing statement or website content count … is your listener able to draw the pictures you want them to see?)

Attitude is Everything

Sometimes you find that managing a team is like pushing a stuck cart out of the mud pit and you seem to be doing all the work.
Well you may not be approaching the problem from the right angle. Organiztions and employees like to feel empowered. You have hired them to do a job, so help them achieve their success and make them feel good about it. Reward them with a “job well done”.
You will be surprised by the oucome. Try it; you’ll like it!